I have been a gardener since I was a child, although not always by choice. Nevertheless, when I was twenty-three I moved to London and my first job was cleaning leaves in the neighbourhood gardens at the Borough of Kensington and Chelsea.

This cold experience (during the autumn months) became my lifetime passion.

I learned a lot about gardening in a large, urban plot. I loved it and by 1999 I wanted to learn more and more. I therefore did a Horticulture course at the famous Kew Botanic Gardens. Here I learned the highest standards of professional craft horticultural skills through structured training in amenity and botanical horticulture. Later I moved to Inchbald School to finish my academic studies and to be able to put together all of my skills.

After this great experience, I started working at different, local companies, gaining recognition for my level of service and quality in garden design projects, landscaping, maintenance routines and wood craftsmanship. Finally I was ready to stand alone, and become a professional gardener.

Gardening is not an exact science. Many factors influence what a gardener does – soil and climate are the most obvious examples of this. However, one thing is certain: when you do things is important. A gardener has to be thinking and planning ahead at all times. When, how and why are the key for all duties in the garden. The acquisition of skills and knowledge is one of the most enjoyable aspects of gardening. Pruning, drainage, irrigation systems, manures, planting, soil management and disease prevention are some of the basic techniques that you need to specialise in.

Some gardeners are exhibitors, others collectors or artists, but perhaps the most widespread need of all is to be able to create a place in which to spend free-time in a relaxing and pleasant environment entertaining friends and family.